// Nic Green with Rosana Cade // Cock And Bull

photo credit Manual Vason.jpg

 

Also created with Laura Bradshaw
LX design Eleni Thomaidou
Tech Support Murray Wason

Originally conceived for the eve of the 2015 UK general election, Cock and Bull sees three females convene to perform their own, alternative, party conference. Exploring power, voice, agency and sustainability, they use the most-heard phrases from near- past governmental rhetoric, to dismantle and redress dominant paradigms of power and Politics.

Responding to the meaninglessness and repetition of empty political promises, the privilege of the governmental elite and the deep discontent of an increasingly disproportionate and divided society, this work is part protest, part catharsis, part exorcism. It also becomes in part, a demonstration of togetherness.

This is the first time Cock and Bull has been presented in its durational version, lasting the length of an average sitting in the House of Commons.

Over seven and a half hours the piece will transform a choreography of words, underpinned with the real-time energy of political dissatisfaction and tory tongue- speak.

**** ‘A blistering, beautiful act’. What’s On Stage

**** ‘Astonishing….Unforgettable performances’ The Scotsman

Cock and Bull won the Total Theatre award for ‘Best Physical/Visual Theatre,’ Edinburgh Fringe 2016

Artist Bio:

For a decade I have identified as an independent artist, working across performative disciplines. The work I create is varied in style and form, but all the things I have made to date explore the possibilities of reciprocity, in the contexts of liveness. Within the possibilities of performance, forms are often ‘found’ through relational practice with people, place and/or material, through collaborative methodology. I am concerned about the culture of individualism and seek to find ways of being together which work against this social phenomenon. I am not sure about all this ‘this is my practice’ stuff. If I have to identify a sense of practice, it is to do the application of ideas and values, rather than the habituation of action. I believe the best things I have made have been the things no one wanted me to make, outside of industry systems.

%d bloggers like this: